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Cultural Analysis: !Kung San

Annotated Bibliography
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Annotated Bibliography

Here is a listing of the different resources used in the creation of this website. Rather than using a normal bibliography, we'll be using an annotated bibliography so that not only do we have a cited source, but we also have some additional text that might insight you to investigate further.

[0] Barnett, Antony (June 17, 2001). Secrets of the Hoodia Cactus Stolen. Retrieved December 15, 2005, from http://www.blackherbals.com/hoodia_cactus.htm.

Reprint of an article about pharmaceutical companies stealing natural remedies from different cultures.

[1] Berberich, Christina (n.d.). The !Kung San. Retrieved October 2, 2005, from http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/cultural/oldworld/africa/kung_san.html.

This site provides a bit more information about the pastime of the !Kung. We learn a little about eating habits as well as a glimpse into their personal relationships.

[2] Brett, Nigel (March 21, 2000). San Culture. Retrieved December 11, 2005, from http://www.webnb.btinternet.co.uk/newpage25.htm.

This is a good look at the San approach to nature and art. Included is a couple San myths.

[3] Encyclopedia Britannica (n.d.). Kalahari. Retrieved December 13, 2005, from http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-36989.

Good information on the climate of the Kalahari desert.

[4] Gajdos, Gina (2002). Survival of the !Kung San people in the Kalahari Desert. Retrieved October 14, 2005, from http://kyky.essortment.com/kungsanpeople_rftw.htm.

This site analyzes the !Kung San's lifestyle providing look at their social organization as well as their material culture. The author goes in-depth into the societal layout explaining why a status differentiation exists between men and women even though the emphasis on modesty enforces more of an egalitarian nature.

[5] Henslin, James M.. Sociology, A Down To Earth Approach. Massachusetts: Pearson, 2005.

This is the class textbook which provides definitions for a number of the terms being used in this analysis.

[6] Hitchcock, Robert K. (September 30, 1988). Decentralization and Development Among the Ju/Wasi, Namibia. Retrieved December 16, 2005, from http://209.200.101.189/publications/csq/csq-article.cfm?id=215.

Article on the military influence on the San people of Namibia.

[7] Kidd, Kenneth K. (2005). ALFRED detailed record information. Retrieved October 14, 2005, from http://alfred.med.yale.edu/alfred/recordinfo.asp?
condition=(populations.pop_name='!Kung San')
.

This site provides population statistics for the !Kung San as well as geographic locations and primary language.

[8] Kirchengast, S. (November, 1998). Weight status of adult !Kung San and Kavango people from northern Namibia.. Retrieved October 14, 2005, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed
&list_uids=9818961&dopt=Abstract
.

This is an abstract from a larger paper (unsure how to get access to the actual paper). This abstract compares the body mass index (BMI) of the hunter-gatherer societies in South Africa. Put in context of the gradual sedentary life style of these people, we can see the effects of nutritional status on environment stress.

[9] Suroviak, Cathy (n.d.). The !Kung of the Kalahari Desert. Retrieved October 2, 2005, from http://www.ucc.uconn.edu/~epsadm03/kung.html.

Using information from Nisa: The Life and Words of a !Kung Woman, this site provides a good overview of the !Kung. Included is a bit about the environment that the !Kung live in as well as their rituals and traditions.

[10] Tu, Jean-Louis (1999). Cooking Practices and Health of Hunter-Gatherers. Retrieved October 14, 2005, from http://www.beyondveg.com/tu-j-l/raw-cooked/raw-cooked-3f.shtml.

This is a part of broader paper entitled Is Cooked Food Poison?. This section deals primarily with the diet of the !Kung San paying attention to what is available to them in their sparse environment. Here we find that the biggest staple in the !Kung diet is the mongongo nut.

[11] Unknown (October 19, 1996). Marjorie Shostak, a feminist among the bush people. Retrieved October 14, 2005, from http://dieoff.org/page107.htm.

This is an obituary from Marjorie Shostak, author of Nisa. In 1971 she went and lived with the !Kung for a time and observed the culture. Again in 1993 she went back to see that the !Kung way of life had changed.

[12] Unknown (n.d.). !Kung. Retrieved December 11, 2005, from http://cesa.imb.org/peoplegroups/!kung.htm.

Though the site is primarily focusing on the introduction of Christianity into other cultures, this page gives a great amount of information about the !Kung people, including politics, religion and their military.

[13] Unknown (n.d.). Tribes in the Kalahari Desert. Retrieved December 15, 2005, from http://abbott-infotech.co.za/tribes%20in%20the%20kalahari.html.

This site has a good write-up about how birth, death, marriage and initiation are handled in the Bushman way of life.

[14] Wikipedia (October 2, 2005). Bushmen. Retrieved October 14, 2005, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bushmen.

This is a broader overview of the bushmen peoples of South Africa. This gives a good introduction into the life of a hunter-gathering society living in a difficult environment.

[15] Wikipedia (October 4, 2005). !Kung people. Retrieved October 14, 2005, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/!Kung_people.

This is a quick reference guide giving a brief overview of the !Kung mythology.

[16] Wikipedia (September 8, 2005). !Kung language. Retrieved October 14, 2005, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/!Kung.

This site gives us more information on the !Kung dialect including the usage of sounds that are included in the language.



This site was created for SOCIOLOGY 1 SEC DE1 (21594) FALL 2005.